Clinical Pharmacology of Miami // Drug Repurposing

Clinical Pharmacology of Miami

Clinical Pharmacology of Miami

The Division of Clinical Pharmacology is primarily a research division, dedicated to the investigation of the effects of pharmacological agents in humans. The Division is located within the self-contained, locked and secured, Clinical Pharmacology Research Unit (CPRU) directly on the Campus of the University of Miami Miller School of Medicine.

The University of Miami Division of Clinical Pharmacology has three core missions:

First is our conduct of original research into the mechanisms of drug action in humans. Major areas of original research are (1) drug effects on potassium homeostasis, (2) mechanisms and treatment of postmenopausal and sodium-sensitive hypertension (3) translational research in proteinuric kidney disease.

Second, we have developed special expertise in the design and conduct of special populations pharmacokinetic, pharmacodynamic and safety studies including renal impairment, hepatic impairment, postmenopausal hypertension, elderly, women’s health, rheumatology, osteoarthritis, diabetes mellitus, and healthy volunteers. The CPRU enjoys an international reputation as a premier study site for conducting phase I studies in special populations.

Third, our Division supports the general medical school research infrastructure by functioning as a core clinical research center and providing the expertise, study design, and research bed resources to help support the work of our colleagues.

The University of Miami Division of Clinical Pharmacology has been conducting Phase I, II and III clinical research for pharmaceutical and biotech companies for more than 20 years. The University of Miami Medical School complex has three large teaching hospitals and their associated specialty clinics. Our Division interacts closely with faculty members within the Department of Medicine and other departments, and can conduct phase I protocols requiring a wide array of special populations. As one of the largest medical centers in the United States, our Phase I unit draws from a huge patient population base and a large number of specialty clinics.

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Only one?

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Dr. Nicholas Dodman, Professor of Behavioral Pharmacology and Director of the Behavior Clinic at Tufts University School of Veterinary Medicine and internationally known specialist in domestic animal behavioral research, explains declawing:
"The inhumanity of the procedure is clearly demonstrated by the nature of cats' recovery from anesthesia following the surgery. Unlike routine recoveries, including recovery from neutering surgeries, which are fairly peaceful, declawing surgery results in cats bouncing off the walls of the recovery cage because of excruciating pain. Cats that are more stoic huddle in the corner of the recovery cage, immobilized in a state of helplessness, presumably by overwhelming pain

Perspective from vets and behaviorists

by platomommy

Dr. Nicholas Dodman, Professor of Behavioral Pharmacology and Director of the Behavior Clinic at Tufts University School of Veterinary Medicine and internationally known specialist in domestic animal behavioral research, explains declawing:
"The inhumanity of the procedure is clearly demonstrated by the nature of cats' recovery from anesthesia following the surgery. Unlike routine recoveries, including recovery from neutering surgeries, which are fairly peaceful, declawing surgery results in cats bouncing off the walls of the recovery cage because of excruciating pain. Cats that are more stoic huddle in the corner of the recovery cage, immobilized in a state of helplessness, presumably by overwhelming pain

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Pharmacist Provider Status  — Pharmacy Times
In 2000, North Carolina was able to pass legislation that created a clinical pharmacist practitioner (CPP). We were able to work with the medical director for Medicare's Fiscal Intermediate to allow a CPP to bill for medical care as a provider.